Author Tidbits: Sharon Creech

I realized that it’s about time for another Author Tidbit. This one’s subject is Sharon Creech, author of Granny Torelli Makes Soup, Love That Dog, The Castle Corona, and others. Sharon Creech was born in South Euclid, Ohio, where she lived with her large family. They often went on trips, and some of the places they visited worked their way into her stories, such as Quincy, Kentucky, which became Bybanks, Kentucky, and was featured in three of Sharon’s books. She has lived in not only America, but also England and Switzerland. Sharon did not immediately want to be a writer. She had several things she wanted to do when she was a child, such as be an ice skater, but ultimately studied stories and writing in college. She then went on to become a teacher in these subjects herself. It was through these experiences that she became what she is now, a published author. Although Sharon at first started out writing for adults, she soon moved on to writing for kids, and her first book geared towards this younger audience was Absolutely Normal Chaos. A later book, Walk Two Moons, which was the first to be published in America, succeeded in winning the Newbery Medal. Lots of Sharon’s books are about kids going through tough times, but others are more fantastical. However, speaking as one who has read nearly all of them, I would recommend any that catches your eye. I know I’ve read a few more than once, and with good reason. Sharon Creech lives with her husband in Chautauqua, New York, and has two grown children.

A Crooked Kind of Perfect

This book is a great break for when you’ve just finished a humungous, confusing novel and your brain is going, “Aaaaahhh!” at the prospect of reading another. A Crooked Kind of Perfect, written by Linda Urban, is short and thoroughly enjoyable. You could even call it refreshing. The focus of the book is Zoe Elias, whose biggest dream is to become a champ piano player and perform at Carnegie Hall. All she needs is a gorgeous piano to get her started. So you can imagine her excitement when her father goes to buy her one. And what does he come back with? The Perfectone D-60. An organ. With “Luxuriously realistic walnut veneer!” says the brochure. Needless to say, Zoe is not exactly thrilled. Then she’s entered into the Perfectone Perform-O-Rama. It’s practice, practice, practice! And that’s not all Zoe has to worry about. Best friends, boys, and an ever-working mother also play parts in this book. This book is funny, honest, and Zoe has a unique voice that sucked me in right away. Like I said, this book is a good refresher after plowing through a big novel, but even if you’re not using it for that, it’s still a rewarding read. I suggest you check it out!